THE ACCOUNTS
These Accounts Document A Collection Of Inspiring Things For/from My Thesis (September 2009-April 2010). If you type "thesis idea" in the search engine, you'll get the gist of what I worked on! You can also check out my other blog - houseandhomme.tumblr.com
THE ACCOUNTS
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ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
ARCHITECTURAL PETROLOGY: OTO ARQUITECTOS’ VOLCANIC FOGO ISLAND NATURAL PARK HEADQUARTERS
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concretedesignhouse:

ummhello:

Bridal Veil, Louis Sicard

Brilliant.
concretedesignhouse:

ummhello:

Bridal Veil, Louis Sicard

Brilliant.
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remash:

9/11 national memorial ~ pwp landscape architecture
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nnmprv:

Ampliamento del cimitero di San Mauro Torinese by Raimondo Guidacci.
nnmprv:

Ampliamento del cimitero di San Mauro Torinese by Raimondo Guidacci.
nnmprv:

Ampliamento del cimitero di San Mauro Torinese by Raimondo Guidacci.
nnmprv:

Ampliamento del cimitero di San Mauro Torinese by Raimondo Guidacci.
nnmprv:

Ampliamento del cimitero di San Mauro Torinese by Raimondo Guidacci.
nnmprv:

Ampliamento del cimitero di San Mauro Torinese by Raimondo Guidacci.
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arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
arzitekt:

Brion Cemetery by Carlo Scarpa / 1972
One of my favourite buildings by one of my favourite architects. Scarpa was a creative genius with a unique architectural language.
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odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
odditiesoflife:

Recoleta Cemetery — The City of the Dead
A Doric-columned portico marks the entrance to the city of the dead, Recoleta Cemetery in Buenos Aires, Argentina - a city within a city. Here is where the great and powerful of Argentina’s history rest in peace. Former presidents, military generals, artists, scientists and, most famously, Eva Perón (picture 7), are buried here in fabulous mausoleums of stone and bronze.
There are more than 6,400 tombs densely packed against one another along narrow alleyways and somber avenues. A cemetery with mausoleums like these are rare - row upon row of narrow miniature stone buildings, some four or five stories tall. Each unique and topped with gilded ornaments and detailed carvings.
They stand as symbols of Buenos Aires’ golden age (1880-1930), when the city was one of the richest in the world. The finest architects from Paris were commissioned to build their mausoleums in the image of the great palaces that mirrored the opulence of the surrounding neighborhood - a city within a city. With its elaborate architecture representing styles from Art Deco, Baroque and Gothic, the cemetery is an extremely popular tourist attraction with more than half a million visitors a year.
sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
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nnmprv:

Treptow Crematorium by Shultes Frank Architeckten.
Photos by Dacian Groza.
nnmprv:

Treptow Crematorium by Shultes Frank Architeckten.
Photos by Dacian Groza.
nnmprv:

Treptow Crematorium by Shultes Frank Architeckten.
Photos by Dacian Groza.
nnmprv:

Treptow Crematorium by Shultes Frank Architeckten.
Photos by Dacian Groza.
nnmprv:

Treptow Crematorium by Shultes Frank Architeckten.
Photos by Dacian Groza.
nnmprv:

Treptow Crematorium by Shultes Frank Architeckten.
Photos by Dacian Groza.
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rudygodinez:

Peter Behrens, Crematorium in Hagen-Delstern, Germany, (1906-1907)
“At Düsseldorf, Behrens became very interested in the Theosophist geometry of Lauweriks and De Bazel. Behrens went all the way with this geometry in a number of his subsequent buildings, especially the Crematorium in Hagen. Walter Gropius implied that Behrens had gone too far, but that he had always liked the Crematorium.”
- Stanford Adams, from “Considering Peter Behrens”
Designing with the strict geometric principles of closed, cubic symmetry in mind, Behrens’ was able to make his relatively small structure seem monumental. His design is equally indebted to the strong lineaments of art nouveau as to the purely functional practicality for which He was later known.
The crematorium opened in 1911, while cremation was still illegal in Germany.
rudygodinez:

Peter Behrens, Crematorium in Hagen-Delstern, Germany, (1906-1907)
“At Düsseldorf, Behrens became very interested in the Theosophist geometry of Lauweriks and De Bazel. Behrens went all the way with this geometry in a number of his subsequent buildings, especially the Crematorium in Hagen. Walter Gropius implied that Behrens had gone too far, but that he had always liked the Crematorium.”
- Stanford Adams, from “Considering Peter Behrens”
Designing with the strict geometric principles of closed, cubic symmetry in mind, Behrens’ was able to make his relatively small structure seem monumental. His design is equally indebted to the strong lineaments of art nouveau as to the purely functional practicality for which He was later known.
The crematorium opened in 1911, while cremation was still illegal in Germany.
rudygodinez:

Peter Behrens, Crematorium in Hagen-Delstern, Germany, (1906-1907)
“At Düsseldorf, Behrens became very interested in the Theosophist geometry of Lauweriks and De Bazel. Behrens went all the way with this geometry in a number of his subsequent buildings, especially the Crematorium in Hagen. Walter Gropius implied that Behrens had gone too far, but that he had always liked the Crematorium.”
- Stanford Adams, from “Considering Peter Behrens”
Designing with the strict geometric principles of closed, cubic symmetry in mind, Behrens’ was able to make his relatively small structure seem monumental. His design is equally indebted to the strong lineaments of art nouveau as to the purely functional practicality for which He was later known.
The crematorium opened in 1911, while cremation was still illegal in Germany.
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ryanpanos:

Barcelona Pavilion | Mies van der Rohe | Pete Sieger
ryanpanos:

Barcelona Pavilion | Mies van der Rohe | Pete Sieger
ryanpanos:

Barcelona Pavilion | Mies van der Rohe | Pete Sieger
ryanpanos:

Barcelona Pavilion | Mies van der Rohe | Pete Sieger
ryanpanos:

Barcelona Pavilion | Mies van der Rohe | Pete Sieger
ryanpanos:

Barcelona Pavilion | Mies van der Rohe | Pete Sieger